Climate Change Already Affecting Global Food Production, Study Says

, , , ,
Climate Change Already Affecting Global Food Production, Study Says

6/14/2019

Progressive FARMER reports a recent study by University of Minnesota on the effects of climate change in major crops.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with help from researchers at the Universities of Oxford and Copenhagen, have seen firsthand some of the effects of climate change on global food production. They released a study showing climate change is already affecting production in the world’s top 10 crops and energy sources, although the effects are geographically uneven.

In the study led by University of Minnesota scientist Deepak Ray, researchers determined barley, cassava, maize, oil palm, rapeseed, rice, sorghum, soybean, sugarcane and wheat are in for a wild ride for years to come as the climate continues to change. With the uneven effects of these changes, some regions are coming out on top while others are faring much worse.

You can see the study here: https://journals.plos.org/….

HERE, THERE, AND EVERYWHERE

Climate change yield effects are relatively positive in North and Central America, Latin America and Asia, whereas Australia, Southern Africa, and Europe are seeing generally negative impacts, the researchers concluded. Half of all food-insecure countries are among those experiencing climate-related crop yield losses.

As for the Midwest, rising temperatures allowed some yield increases in certain crops, including corn, sorghum, soybeans and sugarcane. On the other hand, barley, rice and wheat decreased in yields. Other regions are seeing consistent yield losses, including parts of the southern and eastern U.S.

You can read more about the University of Minnesota study here: https://twin-cities.umn.edu/….

Skills

Posted on

July 12, 2019

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.

Follow by Email
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Instagram